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July 24, 2014

Economic Development Boosted by Plant Science

Modern plant biotechnology and crop protection products not only help farmers grow more crops, but they can also help stimulate local and national economies and marketplaces. Stable and increased crop yields can help farmers enjoy improved incomes. Better crop productivity leads to higher volumes which can stabilize and grow domestic and export markets, as well as lower food prices for consumers. In addition, with access to more diverse seeds, farmers can grow new crops, which allow consumers to enjoy more choices in local markets. Huge investment by the plant science industry into research and development for new products – estimated at

Agricultural Technologies Give Small Farmers Big Opportunities

The use of agricultural technologies can make a particularly large impact on the economics of small-scale farmers. For example, the majority of farms in Ghana are small-scale and rely on cocoa as their main source of income. But because the cocoa crop is prone to attack from pests and diseases, farmers are often unable to make a return on their harvest, and yields and incomes can be unreliable. Around 40 percent of the entire cocoa crop in Ghana is lost every year to disease. ...

Biotech Cotton Grows Burkina Faso’s Export Market

Burkina Faso is one of the poorest countries in the world, with more than 80 percent of the population reliant on subsistence agriculture in a region where there is little rainfall and the soil quality is poor. Cotton, known as “white gold”, has become essential to the economy and one of its top exports. Production and exports of this commodity have dramatically increased since insect-protected Bt cotton was introduced there in 2008....

Investment in Plant Science Pays Off for Farmers

In the last 50 years, farmers have tripled global food production due to new and improved crop protection products and plant biotechnology. Such agricultural technologies result from the plant science industry’s continuous investment in research and development (R&D)....

Agricultural Technologies Tackle Climate Change

Drought, flooding and temperature extremes resulting from climate change will increase as the earth’s temperatures rise 2-3 °C (4-6 °F) in the next 50 years, threatening farm productivity and increasing pest pressures. Yet, farmers are charged with producing more food on less land while minimizing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. ...

Plant Science Reduces Pressure on Agricultural Biodiversity

Advances in agricultural technologies, such as innovative crop protection products and biotech seeds, allow farmers to make the most of existing cropland and curb expanding acres with minimal adverse effects to biodiversity. Between 35 and 42 per cent of the world's potential crop production is lost annually due to weeds, insects, diseases and other pests – many of which are invasive species. ...

Biotech Crop Traits Conserve Water

It takes an average of 3,000 liters (about 793 gallons) of water per person worldwide to produce enough food for a day. This staggering fact highlights the need to conserve water, especially on a planet undergoing climate change with prolonged droughts and extreme temperatures. Without conservation efforts, it’s estimated that half of the world will be under severe water stress in the next 20 years. Since agriculture accounts for 70 per cent of global water use, it has a huge responsibility to protect this life-giving resource....

Crop Protection Tools Preserve Soil Quantity and Quality

Up to 50,000 square kilometers of soil – about the size of Costa Rica – is lost every year worldwide, primarily through erosion. This makes protecting soil, one of the most important natural resources, a key priority in global agriculture. If left unprotected, half of our current cropland, especially in Africa, is predicted to become unusable due to desertification and land degradation. The latter can damage both ecosystems and food supplies as arable land becomes obsolete....

Plant Science Helps Farmers Look After Planet

As Earth Day approaches on 22 April, it is a good time to highlight how plant science helps farmers grow enough food for all of us, in ways that look after the planet. ...

Plant Science Critical to Weathering Climate Change

The importance of using a mix of agricultural technologies to withstand climate change and feed a global population of 9 billion in 2050 has been highlighted in a landmark study. Using a first-of-its-kind data model and dividing the world into 21,000 geographic sections it pinpoints the agricultural technologies and practices that can most significantly reduce food prices and food insecurity....

Crop Protection Could Reduce Global Hunger by 9%

Crop protection could reduce global hunger by nearly 9 per cent in 2050, improving the well-being of 100 million people, according to the 2014 report “Food Security in a World of Growing Natural Resource Scarcity: the Role of Agricultural Technologies” by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)....

No-Till Farming Best Way to Boost Maize and Wheat Yields

No-till farming, which refers to minimal or no soil disturbance, will be the single most impactful way to improve maize and wheat yields in 2050 according to the 2014 report “Food Security in a World of Growing Natural Resource Scarcity: the Role of Agricultural Technologies” by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). If fully adopted by farmers it can increase global maize yields 67 per cent on irrigated hectares and 20 per cent on rain-fed hectares. It can also boost global wheat yields by 34 per cent on irrigated hectares and 22 per cent on rain-fed hectares. ...

Biotech Needed to Cope With Changing Climate

Heat and drought tolerance and nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) in crops will be key to mitigating the effects of climate change, states the 2014 report “Food Security in a World of Growing Natural Resource Scarcity: the Role of Agricultural Technologies” by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Each of these crop traits can help address the most threatening impacts of climate change: rising temperatures and longer droughts which is why the plant biotech industry is currently investing heavily into their development. ...

Plant Science May Keep Food Prices Low

The anticipated negative effects of climate change on agricultural productivity, along with projected population growth by 2050, suggest that food insecurity and prices will increase, says the 2014 report “Food Security in a World of Growing Natural Resource Scarcity: the Role of Agricultural Technologies” by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Compared to 2005, food prices for maize, rice and wheat are projected to increase by 104, 79 and 88 per cent, respectively, in 2050. At the same time, the number of people at risk of hunger in the developing world will grow to more than a billion....

Plant Science Improves Valentine’s Day Celebrations

Plant science can impact on our lives in ways we might never imagine. ...

Crop Protection Products Increase Cocoa Production

What would Valentine’s Day be without chocolate? If it weren’t for crop protection products, many pests and diseases would severely impact cocoa production in West Africa, which produces about 70 per cent of the world’s cocoa....

Heard on the Grapevine: Crop Protection Products Essential

Almost all celebrations deserve a toast – and grape quality is vital to creating a top quality wine. The quality of grapes can be significantly affected by disease, and farmers rely on crop protection products to help keep their wine grapes healthy and productive. ...

Violets are Red and Roses are Blue

Flowers are one of the most common gifts at Valentine’s Day – and plant biotechnology has brought unique blue roses and carnations to florists. ...

Improved Oils for Healthier Hearts

The heart health of millions of people is improving because of many countries’ efforts to remove artificial trans fat in the form of partially hydrogenated (PH) vegetable oils from their food supplies. ...

Top Five Plant Science Contributions to Society

Plant science contributes significantly to society without most people even knowing. It helps increase food security by preventing crop losses, improving yields and food quality as well as augmenting the nutritional value of staple crops....

Plant Science Increases Food Production

Helping farmers grow enough food to feed the world is one of the primary objectives of the plant science industry. It does so by continuously offering new and improved crop protection products and biotech seeds. These technologies can help increase food security now and in the future. ...

Plant Science Improves Food Quality

Malnutrition affects 1 billion people worldwide and causes almost 10 million deaths a year. But it can be significantly reduced by improving crop quality and quantity. Plant science technologies are critical to this effort. ...

Plant Science Protects Biodiversity with Best Land Use

Advances in agricultural technologies, such as innovative crop protection products and biotech seeds, allow farmers to make the most of existing cropland and curb expanding acres with minimal adverse effects to biodiversity. ...

Plant Science Helps Mitigate Climate Change

As climate change continues to cause unusual and unpredictable weather around the world, it is creating new challenges for farmers. ...

Plant Science Improves Farmer Livelihoods

Agriculture is two to four times more effective at reducing hunger and poverty than any other sector, leading to greater farmer incomes, better education of farm children, more investment in rural development and increased food production....

Intellectual Property is All Around Us

The world would be a very different place without intellectual property (IP). Imagine a day without a coffee maker, smart phone, computer, car or even clothes! You wouldn’t be able to wake up on time, easily connect with people, work efficiently or perhaps even get to work. Protecting IP literally keeps our daily lives functioning....

Intellectual Property Protection Drives Invention

From better computers to smarter phones and more productive farming to new medicines, many innovations are the result of intellectual property (IP) protection. Farmers, for example, have tripled global food production in the past 50 years thanks to innovations in crop protection products, biotechnology and more. IP protection will ensure that new agricultural innovations are available to help farmers meet the challenge of feeding billions of people for decades to come....

Agricultural Advancement Fueled by Intellectual Property Rights

Invention has always been a part of agriculture; almost everything that we eat today is the result of plant breeding or biotechnology on some level – from fruits and vegetables to crop commodities such as soybeans and corn. Plant breeding is the art and science of improving plant traits to produce desired characteristics. It has been practiced since near the beginning of human civilization – 9,000 to 11,000 years ago. ...

Get Smart About Intellectual Property via IP52.org

Have you wondered how inventions are turned into usable products or processes? Did you know that just about everything you use – from a coffee maker to your mode of transportation – is the result of intellectual property (IP) protection? As the engine of invention, IP protection rewards inventors for turning their ideas into societal benefits....

Agriculture Can Adapt to Climate Change

As climate change continues to cause unusual and unpredictable weather around the world, it is creating new challenges for farmers....

Global Farmers Prepare for Climate Change

On World Food Day 2013 (Oct. 16), CropLife International hosted a webinar entitled “The Next Green Revolution: How Farmers Will Feed a Warmer World.” Five farmers from around the globe discussed how they will meet these challenges with modern agricultural practices and technologies. ...

Agricultural Policies Key to Combating Climate Change

Climate change and agriculture are uniquely inter-related. Farmers are already being impacted by climate change and they need help from policymakers, politicians and the plant science industry. ...

Rising Temperatures Impact Global Coffee Production

From changing rainfall patterns to rising sea levels and higher temperatures, the impacts of climate change on agriculture are significant. Each creates new challenges for farmers....

Cassava’s Drought Tolerance Aids Warming World

Cassava is a staple food in the developing world, serving as the base diet for more than 750 million people. It’s the second greatest source of energy after maize and a consistent source of income for farmers, even under tough environmental conditions....

The Story of Climate Change

Agricultural yields across much of the world are expected to decrease due to climate change, highlighted in an infographic from Farming First. ...

Van Montagu Lauded for Developing First Form of Modern Biotechnology

Growing up in Belgium during World War II, 2013 World Food Prize Laureate Marc Van Montagu experienced a time when food was scarce and precious. As a result, he recognized the importance of food production at a very early age. ...

Founders of Modern Biotechnology Win 2013 World Food Prize

The World Food Prize is the Nobel Peace Prize of the food world – the preeminent international award that honours individuals who have advanced human development by improving the quality, quantity or availability of food. Their achievements may be in food science, technology, manufacturing, marketing, nutrition, agricultural economics, poverty alleviation, political leadership or social sciences. The 2013 World Food Prize honours three plant scientists – Drs. Marc Van Montagu, Mary-Dell Chilton and Robert T. Fraley – who are considered the founders of modern plant biotechnology....

Chilton Honoured for Creating First Genetically Modified Plant

When Mary-Dell Chilton, 2013 World Food Prize Laureate, enrolled in her first biology class, she surprised her teachers with a stellar score on the national science exam. Little did anyone know at the time the significance of this score … she would become one of the founders of modern biotechnology....

Fraley Lauded as Pioneer of Modern Plant Biotechnology

“Innovation must increase to enable agriculture to keep pace with demand,” says World Food Prize Laureate Robert T. Fraley, executive vice president and chief technology officer at Monsanto Company in St. Louis, Mo., U.S.A. This mantra inspired a lifelong career. ...

Planting Seeds of Equality

About 60 to 80 per cent of small-scale farmers worldwide are women, who produce about half of all food. In Africa, they produce 90 per cent. ...

Agribusiness and USAID Support Ethiopian Farmers

Maize is critical to Ethiopia’s economic and social welfare, providing jobs, income and food for more than 30,000 small-scale farmers, many of whom are women. Yet production challenges have prevented them from reaching their full potential. ...

Herbicides Can Reduce Inefficiencies for Women in Africa

Weeds are one of the most serious threats to African food production as they compete with crops. African farmers lose 20 to 100 per cent of their potential crop to uncontrolled weeds each year. ...

Female Farmers Keen to Adopt Plant Technologies

Female farmers are open to plant technologies and may be better managers of them than their male counterparts, according to a 2011 gender study with biotech cotton in Colombia. Women are eager to weed out less efficient ways of doing things and reduce manual labour. ...

Sharing the Story: Malawi Farmer Sustains his Community

Andrew Cliff Kamtoseni, a farmer and village head man in the Kasunga District of Malawi, has applied sustainable farming knowledge he gained from CropLife Africa to increase the productivity of his farm and fight malnutrition in his community. ...

Improving Nutrition with Plant Science

Malnutrition affects one billion people worldwide and causes almost 10 million deaths a year. But it can be significantly reduced by improving access to a variety of foods and enhancing nutritional qualities of staple ingredients. Plant science products and technologies can help in this effort. ...

Vitamin A Deficiencies Targeted with Enriched Seed

Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is a public health problem in more than half of all countries worldwide, especially in Africa and Southeast Asia. It is the leading cause of preventable blindness in children and it increases their risk of disease and death from severe infections. In pregnant women, VAD causes night blindness and may increase the risk of maternal mortality. Finding ways to provide high-risk populations with adequate vitamin A could save many lives and improve quality of life. ...

Healthy Oils Promote Better Nutrition Worldwide

Global edible oil consumption is rising, especially as populous nations like China and India increase their middle classes and have higher demand for oils. And that demand isn’t for just any oils, but rather healthier ones, which have the potential to reduce the risk of widespread public health problems such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Examples include canola and soybean oils, which are relatively low in saturated fat at 7 and 15 percent, respectively. ...

Biofortification Through Biotechnology to Combat Malnutrition

Much of the developing world relies largely on one or more staple crops for nutrition. As a result, they are the focus of biofortification projects to increase levels of nutrients that are often deficient. Major staple crops include wheat and potato worldwide, rice in Asia, maize in Latin America and cassava in Africa. Plant scientists are working on biofortifying these crops with essential amino acids (protein), folic acid, iron and more....

Farming First Launches Interactive Guide to Food and Nutrition Security Initiatives

The Farming First Coalition has launched a new online guide to 35 global and regional food and nutrition security initiatives. The guide offers the first comprehensive analysis of these initiatives and demonstrates the impact they are having on the ground. ...

Growing Green Economies

A “green economy” is one that results in stronger economies and communities while reducing environmental risks and using natural resources wisely. In agriculture, this means increasing food production, adopting sustainable farming practices and improving farmers’ incomes and livelihoods. With innovative farming technologies and practices, it is easier than ever for farmers to increase productivity in a sustainable way. ...

Biotech Crops “Stack” in Favor of Green Economy

Modern biotechnology allows new genes to be efficiently put into plants to achieve desirable traits such as pest protection. Gene stacking refers to combining two or more genes of interest into a single plant. Such “stacked” traits combine insect and disease resistance, herbicide tolerance and/or protection against other environmental stresses. They allow farmers to meet multiple agronomic needs with a single seed. For example, in the Philippines, stacked biotech corn traits for pest resistance and herbicide tolerance account for about 85 per cent of the total biotech area, benefitting 375,000 resource-poor farmers. ...

Plant Science Builds Export Markets

Crop protection products and improved seeds – both conventional and biotech – are essential to boosting agricultural production around the world. This can lead to new and expanded export markets for farmers and promote trade. In India, for example, chili pepper is essential to cuisine and agricultural exports. India is the world’s largest producer of chilies, accounting for half of global production, of which it exports 20 per cent worth US$350 million. ...

Plant Science Companies Invest in Small-Scale Farmers

Investing in agriculture is two to four times more effective at reducing hunger and poverty than any other sector, leading to greater farmer incomes, better education of farm children, more investment in rural development and increased food production. CropLife International member companies have helped small-scale farmers around the world improve their livelihoods by delivering plant science technologies and investing in developing agricultural geographies. ...

Food Loss and Waste Take Bite Out of Global Supply

Each year, about 1.3 billion tons of food is lost or wasted worldwide in farmers’ fields and from consumers’ plates. This is equivalent to all of the food produced yearly in sub-Saharan Africa or more than half of the world's annual cereal crops. With one in seven people going to bed hungry each night and more than 20,000 children under the age of five dying daily from hunger, we cannot afford to lose and waste food....

Plant Science Combats Food Losses

Food loss during the production, post-harvest and processing stages is minimized with the use of crop protection products and biotech seeds, which protect against insects, diseases and weeds. This leads to higher quality food that is better preserved on the way to retailers and more likely to meet high consumer standards with a longer shelf life. ...

Plant Science Products Help Preserve Harvests

Post-harvest crop losses occur through improper storage, which can allow pests to get into storage bins. Crop protection products can sometimes make the difference between retaining a harvest or having none at all. They also protect food during its transportation to market. ...

Plant Science Aids Consumers in Reducing Food Waste

Food waste at the retailer and consumer level is significant in developed countries. Food spoilage is largely to blame but plant science can help prevent it by extending the shelf life of fruits and vegetables. ...

Preserving Biotechnology Through Stewardship

In plant biotechnology, stewardship is a lifecycle approach to product management. It is the responsible and ethical way to manage biotech-derived plant products from their discovery and development to their use and eventual discontinuation. ...

What’s The Dirt on Biodiversity?

On the International Day for Biodiversity, CropLife International calls on farmers, agricultural researchers and policymakers around the world to renew their dedication to the support and advancement of research and education into sustainable agricultural practices that preserve soil; one of our world’s most valuable resources....

Biotech Crop Adoption and Stewardship Go Hand-in-Hand in Africa

As additional countries adopt plant biotechnology in Africa, CropLife International and its global network continue to work with farmers and regulators on ensuring responsible and effective stewardship of biotech crops in the region. “While biotechnology awareness and outreach continue to be important, the principles of stewardship to ensure the technology’s safe application are critical,” says Dr. Florence Wambugu, CEO of Africa Harvest. “Strengthening Africa's capacity in sound biotechnology management is vital to for enhanced food security.” ...

Managing Weed Resistance with Good Agricultural Practices

All forms of agricultural production have historically endured losses to weeds and farmers are continually challenged with the fact that weed control methods have limited life spans. CropLife International held a panel discussion at the 2013 BIO International Convention in Chicago in April to discuss how industry, academia and farmers continually update their weed management strategies to ensure the longevity of herbicide-tolerant (HT) traits. ...

Compact 101: Industry Steps Up to Protect Biodiversity

After 16 years, more than 16 million farmers in 28 countries grow over 170 million hectares of biotech crops. As worldwide use continues to increase, some policymakers have raised questions about what would happen in the unlikely event a biotech crop might cause unintentional damage to biological diversity. In response, biotech companies established the Compact: a clear, fair and binding arbitration process for states seeking legal redress in case of such damage resulting from biotech crops....

Sharing the Story: Better Tea Farming in Thailand Brews Prosperity

Vietnamese tea and cinnamon farmer Tran Thi Thanh admits that before the state office of plant protection came to visit her province, she “knew nothing of the safe use of pesticides.” ...

Five Things You Need to Know About Agricultural Innovation & Intellectual Property

In honour of World Intellectual Property Day, CropLife International has identified the top five facts everyone should know about the importance of intellectual property (IP) to agricultural innovation. Understanding how IP protections can encourage new innovations and drive the growth of agriculture, as well as supporting effective IP rights, will be critical to meeting future food demands...

Better Pesticide Practices in Guatemala Benefit Crops and Consumers

The proper use of crop protection products protects farmers and the environment – key components of good stewardship – but the benefits reach even further. Responsible pesticide use leads to higher quality, more abundant harvests and opens the door to greater economic opportunities for farmers....

Spray Service Improves Farmer Livelihoods in Zambia

CropLife International’s Spray Service Provider (SSP) programmes provide an efficient solution to an issue facing small-scale farmers across the developing world: how to responsibly and effectively apply crop protection products while improving yields. With efficiency and safety in mind, the programme educates and certifies a select group of farmers on best spraying practices, provides them with equipment and safety gear, and teaches them how to offer their spray services to other farmers in their area....

IPM Training Helps African Cocoa Growers

With the support of CropLife Côte d’Ivoire and German Technical Cooperation (GIZ), small-scale cocoa farmers and agrochemical retailers in Côte d’Ivoire are learning about the responsible use of pesticides as part of an overall approach to managing their crops....

Public-Private Partnership: Chinese Farmers Protect Community with Best Practices

In China, the public and private sectors are successfully collaborating on stewardship projects that will help support efforts to bring food security to a nation of nearly 1.34 billion people. Together, CropLife China member companies and China’s National Agri-Technical Extension and Service Centre (part of the country’s Ministry of Agriculture) have trained thousands of farmers on the responsible use, effective application and secure storage of agrochemicals. ...

Global Biotech Crop Adoption Continues to Grow

In February, the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech Applications (ISAAA) released its annual global biotech crop acreage report, which found that farmers worldwide grew 170 million hectares of biotech crops in 2012. Biotech crops are the most rapidly adopted agricultural technology in history — today, they are grown in 28 countries by 17.3 million farmers, a 100-fold increase since they were first commercially planted in 1996. ......

New Countries Adopt Biotech Crops

Two new countries planted biotech crops in 2012 — Sudan and Cuba — and several more are poised to adopt biotech crops in the coming years, according to the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech Applications (ISAAA)...

Study Shows Environmental Benefits of Biotech Crops

Since their commercial introduction almost 20 years ago, biotech crops have helped significantly reduce agriculture’s environmental footprint........

Public-Private Partnership Advances Rice in India

Collaborations between the public and private sectors help provide farmers worldwide with access to plant science technology....

Improving Habitat and Food Sources

Herbicide-tolerant biotech crops are enabling farmers around the world to use environmentally sound herbicides instead of tillage for weed control – known as conservation or no-till practices. ...

Protecting Biodiversity

Growing more food per hectare takes pressure off of the need to convert natural habitats into more farmland – helping protect our planet’s incredible wealth of biodiversity. If higher yielding biotech crops had not been available from 1996 to 2010, an additional 91 million ...

Wide-Ranging Benefits of Biotech

Biotech crops are the fastest adopted crop technology in the history of agriculture. In its annual report on the global status of commercialized biotech crops, the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech Applications (ISAAA) reported that 16.7 million farmers grew biotech crops on 160 million hectares in 2011. ...

Burkina Faso cotton output soars 57.5 pct due to GMOs

Jan 31 (Reuters) - Cotton production in Burkina Faso, one of the first countries in Africa to approve genetically modified cotton, jumped 57.5 percent in 2012-2013 due to an increase in GMO crops, the producers' association said. ...

Innovating for a Healthy Fruit Harvest

Plant diseases pose a serious threat to the world’s fruit crop production. In the U.S., it’s estimated that without the use of fungicides to control plant diseases, yields of most fruit and vegetable crops would decline by 50 to 95 percent. By mitigating the effects of plant diseases, U.S. farmers are able to produce 97 billion pounds of additional food and fiber, providing a sustainable supply of fruits and vegetables that are necessary to a healthy and varied diet. Plant biotechnology can be another tool to reduce losses to diseases. While disease resistant traits are commonly added

Growing More Food

By 2050 the world’s farmers will need to produce 70 percent more food on less land than ever before. Plant biotechnology is being used to create higher-yielding varieties that can help farmers meet this goal. ...

Training Farmers to Use Products Correctly and Safely

The plant science industry is committed to promoting effective stewardship of its products, in and beyond the field. A key focus of the stewardship programmes is training farmers on Integrated Pest Management (IPM), including the responsible use of crop protection products. Farmers learn a variety of techniques to sustainably manage pests on their farms, such as preventing pest build-up by ‘growing a healthy crop’, preserving natural predators and using ...

Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Herbicide-tolerant biotech crops reduce the need for tillage to control weeds, meaning less soil disturbance and fewer passes over the field with heavy tillage equipment. ...

Rice Sustainability in South Asia

In South Asia, rice is traditionally grown by manually transplanting seedlings into flooded soil to help control weeds and give the rice crop a head start against future weed pressure. Then, during the season, weeds are typically controlled by hand weeding. ...

Sustainable Agricultural Practices and Technologies Promote Biodiversity

A key element of sustainable agriculture includes protecting biodiversity to the greatest extent possible. Advances in agricultural technologies, such as innovative crop protection products and biotech seeds, allow farmers to make the most of existing cropland to prevent expansion into natural habitats. ...

Conservation Tillage Benefits

Around the world, herbicide-tolerant biotech crops are enabling farmers to use environmentally sound herbicides instead of tillage for weed control. This switch to conversation agriculture practices (growing crops with minimal soil disturbance) reduces soil ...

Training Farmers in Zambia on Responsible Use of Products

The Spray Service Provider (SSP) Programme is an initiative that promotes the responsible use of crop protection products among the small-scale farming community in Zambia. The programme trains selected farmers who become SSPs ...

Raising Yields to Protect Habitats

Using crop protection products and higher-yielding biotech varieties, farmers are now growing more food on each hectare of land. This helps take the pressure off of the need to convert natural habitats into more farmland. ...

Mitigating Climate Change

The switch to conservation tillage uses less fuel and keeps more carbon in the soil – helping farmers mitigate climate change. For example, in Brazil, lower fuel use associated with the adoption of biotechnology from 1996/97 to 2010/11 reduced C02 emissions by 468,400 tons, which equates to preserving 3.5 million trees. ...

Plant Science Industry Helping Farmers Feed 9 Billion

The plant science industry is always developing new agricultural technologies and tools, which increase crop production on less land in a more sustainable way. Biotech crops, for example, have helped grow more food per acre, including an increase of 97.5 million tonnes of soybeans, 159.4 million tonnes of corn and 6.1 million tonnes of canola worldwide from 1996 to 2010. ...

Mexico Says Yes to Commercial Biotech Soybeans

In June 2012, permits for biotech soybeans were granted to seven Mexican states covering 253,500 hectares in Campeche, Quintana Roo, Yucatan, San Luis Potosi, Tamaulipas, Veracruz and Chiapas. Biotech soybeans have been planted in pilot stages in Mexico since 1995, and the recent approval of commercial soybean production ...